Raina Heaton, Ph.D









CONTACT INFO:

Office Address: Copeland Hall 203

Office Phone: (405) 325-2312

E-mail: rainaheaton@ou.edu

PROFESSIONAL INFORMATION:

Title: Assistant Professor of Native American Studies

Assistant Curator of the Native American Languages Collection at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

Education: Ph.D. Linguistics, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

PERSONAL STATEMENT: 

I am a linguist interested in documenting and describing endangered languages, and I concurrently work with language communities on projects related to language research and language revitalization. I also study rarer syntactic phenomena, primarily the structure and function of antipassives and their relationship to ergativity. My fieldwork to date has centered on the indigenous languages of the Americas, particularly Mayan languages.

AREAS OF INTEREST & EXPERTISE: 

Language documentation and conservation, language endangerment, morphosyntax, typology, language variation and change, language acquisition, ergativity, Mayan languages

RECENT COURSES TAUGHT: 

NAS 4970/5970-900: Language Documentation and Revitalization

SELECTED RESEARCH AND CREATIVE ACTIVITY: 

Heaton, Raina. 2017d Language isolates of Mesoamerica and Northern Mexico. In Language Isolates, ed. by Lyle Campbell, 229-259. London: Routledge.

Heaton, Raina and Igor Xoyón. In press. Collaborative research and assessment in Kaqchikel. In Perspectives on Language and Linguistics: Community-Based Research, ed. by Shannon Bischoff and Carmen Jany, 171-185. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Heaton, Raina. In press. Review of: Romero, Sergio. 2015. Language and ethnicity among the K'ichee' Maya. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press. International Journal of American Linguistics. 

Heaton, Raina, Eve Okura and Lyle Campbell. In press. Women in the history of American Indian linguisticsIn Women in the History of Linguistics, ed. by Wendy Ayres-Bennett and Helena Sanson. Oxford University Press.

Heaton, Raina and Bryn Hauk. In press. Triage: Setting priorities for endangered language research. In Cataloguing the Endangered Languages of the World, ed. by Lyle Campbell and Anna Belew.

Heaton, Raina and Sean Simpson. In press. How the Catalogue of Endangered Languages serves communities whose languages are at risk. In Cataloguing the Endangered Languages of the World, ed. by Lyle Campbell and Anna Belew.

Heaton, Raina. In press. Regional overview: Near East and Central Asia. In Cataloguing the Endangered Languages of the World, ed. by Lyle Campbell and Anna Belew.

Heaton, Raina. 2017c. Active-stative agreement in Tunica. Anthropological Linguistics 58(3):299-326. 

Heaton, Raina. 2017b. A typology of antipassives, with special reference to Mayan. Doctoral dissertation, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

Heaton, Raina and Patricia Anderson. 2017a. When animals become humans: Grammatical gender in Tunica. International Journal of American Linguistics 83(2):341-363.

Heaton, Raina and Igor Xoyón. 2016c. Assessing language acquisition in the

Kaqchikel program at Nimaläj Kaqchikel Amaq’. Language Documentation & Conservation 10:497-521.

Heaton, Raina. 2016b. Variation and change: the case of movement verbs in Kaqchikel. International Journal of American Linguistics 82(3):317-352.

Heaton, Raina, Kamil Deen and William O’Grady. 2016a. An investigation of relativization in Kaqchikel Maya. Lingua 170:35-46.

SELECTED GRANTS: 

Bilinski Dissertation Fellowship

SELECTED CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS:

2017 Heaton, Raina. Towards a unified account of variability in Kaqchikel focus constructions. Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA). Austin TX.

2016 Heaton, Raina. Multiple antipassives, with special reference to Mayan. The 49th annual meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europeae (SLE). Naples, Italy.

2016 Heaton, Raina. How many ‘antipassives’ are there? Towards a functional typology of antipassive-type constructions in Kaqchikel. Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA). Washington DC.

2016 Heaton, Raina and Judith Maxwell. A reevaluation of the perfect in Kaqchikel. Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA). Washington DC.

CURRENT PROJECTS:

Comparative Language Input Project

Tunica Language Project

An investigation of variability in syntactic ergativity in Kaqchikel

A typology of antipassives

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